Raymond Camden
Raymond Camden is a senior developer evangelist for Adobe. His work focuses on web standards, mobile development and ColdFusion. He's a published author and presents at conferences and user groups on a variety of topics. He loves kittens and Star Wars - not necessarily in that order.
Tutorials
  • Game Development
    Using the HTML5 Gamepad API to Add Controller Support to Browser GamesHtml5 gamepad api
    148 shares
    In this article, you'll learn how to use the HTML5 Gamepad API to add controller support to your HTML5 games. We'll focus on the API's implementation within Chrome and Firefox, and look at how to add gamepad support to a real (albeit simple) web game.Read More…
  • Code
    Working With IntlJavascript wide retina preview
    270 shares
    Adding internationalization to your web application is easier than ever with the new Intl API. Let's checkout some of its major features. Read More…
  • Code
    Debugging With the Firefox DevToolsFirefox wide retina preview
    410 shares
    Over the past year I have given a presentation about using the browser for debugging client-side bugs. Throughout the presentation I would focus on using Chrome, as it's my primary browser and I just don't have the time to use multiple browsers while presenting. Now, I do suggest to others that they try out other browsers, as it can be very helpful. So here's a screencast where I'll show you a few sample applications, with some bugs, and how you can use the Firefox DevTools to debug them and compare and contrast the different tools.Read More…
  • Code
    Creating Brackets ExtensionsDeeper in brackets retina preview
    52 shares
    A little while ago I wrote about the recent updates to the Brackets editor. Brackets is an open source project focused on web standards and built with web technologies. It has a narrow focus and therefore may not have a particular feature you've come to depend upon. Luckily, Brackets ships with a powerful extension API that lets you add any number of new features. In this article, I'm going to discuss this API and demonstrate how you can build your own extensions.Read More…
  • Code
    Working With IndexedDB - Part 3Indexeddb retina preview
    6 shares
    Welcome to the final part of my IndexedDB series. When I began this series my intent was to explain a technology that is not always the most... friendly one to work with. In fact, when I first tried working with IndexedDB, last year, my initial reaction was somewhat negative ("Somewhat negative" much like the Universe is "somewhat old."). It's been a long journey, but I finally feel somewhat comfortable working with IndexedDB and I respect what it allows. It is still a technology that can't be used everywhere (it sadly missed being added to iOS7), but I truly believe it is a technology folks can learn and make use of today. In this final article, we're going to demonstrate some additional concepts that build upon the "full" demo we built in the last article. To be clear, you must be caught up on the series or this entry will be difficult to follow, so you may also want to check out part one.Read More…
  • Code
    Deeper In the Brackets EditorDeeper in brackets retina preview
    220 shares
    Brackets Turns 30 (Ditches the Minivan and Goes for the Jet Pack!) Nearly one year ago, Jeffrey Way reviewed the open source Brackets project. In the time since that review Brackets has come quite far, recently celebrating it's 33rd Sprint release. In this article I'll talk about many of the updates as well as demonstrate why Brackets is my favorite editor.Read More…
  • Code
    Working With IndexedDB - Part 2Indexeddb retina preview
    16 shares
    Welcome to the second part of my IndexedDB article. I strongly recommend reading the first article in this series, as I'll be assuming you are familiar with all the concepts covered so far. In this article, we're going to wrap up the CRUD aspects we didn't finish before (specifically updating and deleting content), and then demonstrate a real world application that we will use to demonstrate other concepts in the final article.Read More…
  • Code
    Working With IndexedDBIndexeddb retina preview
    80 shares
    One of the more interesting developments in web standards lately is the Indexed Database (IndexedDB for short) specification. For a fun time you can read the spec yourself. In this tutorial I'll be explaining this feature and hopefully giving you some inspiration to use this powerful feature yourself.Read More…
  • Code
    Going Live With NodeGoing live with node retina preview
    17 shares
    In my previous article I talked about my joy of discovering the Express framework. Express is what makes me feel like I could really build something with Node and have fun doing it. And in fact - I did that! I built some sample web apps and had a lot of fun. But eventually I decided it was time to buckle down and get serious. I liked Node, I loved Express, and if I was really going to commit to learning it, then why not take the final step and actually create a real website using it. Another thing I learned early on during my Node education (Nodacation?) was that having to stop and restart a Node app was a real pain in the rear. I had great success using Nodemon by Remy Sharp. It will notice updates to your code and restart your Node app automatically. This sounds trivial I suppose, but for me my entire experience with Node was at the command line. I'd simply run node app and test away on port 3000. I really didn't know what it involved to get that same application up and running on a real server and responding to a domain. In this article I'll describe two different attempts I made to move a Node app into production. Obviously there's more ways (and look for more articles here at Nettuts+!) so keep in mind this is what I tried and had success with. Read More…
  • Code
    Introduction to ExpressExpress retina preview
    119 shares
    A few years ago I, like many people, began to hear more and more about Node.js. I had been building server-side applications in ColdFusion for over a decade but was always curious to see how other platforms worked as well. I enjoyed JavaScript on the client and using it on the server seemed fascinating. (Although not necessarily new. I'm old enough to remember when Netscape released SSJS back in the 90s.) I read a few tutorials, sat in a few sessions, and in general came away... unimpressed. Read More…