Rachel McCollin
Rachel McCollin is a WordPress developer who writes books, articles and tutorials about web design, with a focus on WordPress and on responsive and mobile development. She runs a web design agency in Birmingham, UK and has published three books on WordPress, including WordPress: Pushing the Limits, an advanced resource for WordPress developers.
Tutorials
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    Creating Your WordPress Knowledge Base's StructureBuilding wordpress knowledgebase preview
    173 shares
    In the second part of this series on using WordPress to build a knowledge base, I'll show you how to register post types and taxonomies for your knowledge base and remove those you don't need.Read More…
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    Planning a WordPress Knowledge BaseBuilding wordpress knowledgebase preview
    277 shares
    WordPress is a fantastic tool for building knowledge bases of all kinds. In this tutorial, the first in a four-part series, I'll explain why and take you through the process of planning your WordPress knowledge base.Read More…
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    Developing Plugins for Your WordPress Theme FrameworkBuild your own theme framework preview image
    296 shares
    By creating your own theme framework, you've created the foundation of a WordPress eco-system that you can develop using not only child themes but plugins, as well. Discover how to get more from your framework by developing plugins for it.Read More…
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    Creating Child Themes for Your WordPress Theme FrameworkBuild your own theme framework preview image
    233 shares
    Sites built using your theme framework will each need to run on a child theme. Here are some approaches to child theming that can make your development more efficient.Read More…
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    Adding Filter Hooks to Your WordPress Theme FrameworkBuild your own theme framework preview image
    232 shares
    Adding filters to your theme framework means that you (or others using your framework) can amend or override code or content at a later date. Here's how to do it.Read More…
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    Displaying Your WordPress Widget on the SiteWordpress widgets preview
    174 shares
    Now that you've coded your widget's form, you need to display its output on the site. Here's how.Read More…
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    Building the Form for Your WordPress WidgetWordpress widgets preview
    177 shares
    Continue building your first WordPress widget by creating the form to help users interact with your widget on the Widgets dashboard screen. Read More…
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    Constructing Your WordPress WidgetWordpress widgets preview
    238 shares
    Continue creating your first WordPress widget by learning how to code the constructor function for it. Read More…
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    Coding and Registering Your WordPress WidgetWordpress widgets preview
    219 shares
    Start to develop your WordPress widget by creating a class to create it and registering it with WordPress.Read More…
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    Adding Functions to Your WordPress Theme FrameworkBuild your own theme framework preview image
    251 shares
    In the last part of this series, you added some action hooks to your theme framework. In this tutorial you'll write some functions which you activate via those hooks. In this tutorial I'll show you how to add widget areas to three of those and a custom function to the last one.Read More…
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    Introduction to Creating Your First WordPress WidgetWordpress widgets preview
    264 shares
    Widgets allow you or anyone using your site, theme or plugin to place content into the sidebar or any other widget area without having to write code. In this five part series I'll show you how to create a widget.Read More…
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    Adding Action Hooks to Your WordPress Theme FrameworkBuild your own theme framework preview image
    313 shares
    The advantage of creating action hooks in your framework is that any content you attach to them can easily be overwritten by functions in a child theme or by plugins. This saves you creating duplicate template files in your child themes and gives you more flexibility. In this tutorial you'll add some action hooks to your template files, which you'll then attach functions to in the next tutorial. After that, you'll add some filter hooks.Read More…