Genevieve DeGuzman
Genevieve DeGuzman is the co-founder and editor of Night Owls Press, an editorial services and indie publishing company for small businesses and organizations. Night Owls Press publishes print and digital books on business innovation, social entrepreneurship, the collaborative economy, D-I-Y culture, and education.
Tutorials
  • Business
    15+ Buzzworthy Techniques to Promote Your Freelance BrandPreview
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    One of the biggest mistakes you can make as a freelancer is to ignore building and promoting your brand. Starting my freelance business in 2010, I shrugged my shoulders at the thought of branding strategy. It sounded like something that only larger businesses engaged in, not freelancers. Over the years, I’ve learned that brand promotion is actually a critical part of a freelancer’s overall business, no matter how small. With a little effort, you too can build a better freelance business with strategic branding. Branding promotion as we see it used by big companies (e.g. Apple, Ben and Jerry’s, or Starbucks) and branding for freelancers are similar in many ways. Essentially, branding is everything you do as a business that makes others remember you. For freelancers, however, branding takes on a very special meaning. As a freelancer you are your business. So, in effect, you are your own brand.Read More…
  • Business
    25+ Professional Resources for Getting Started as a Freelance EditorProfessional resources getting started freelance editor
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    Launching into a career as a freelance editor is relatively easy. Unlike our web and graphic design colleagues, editors can start working on their own without too much investment in expensive software or equipment. There are the usual prerequisites of course: You need a staunch command of language and a natural grace with rational and creative discourse. There are the usual prerequisites of course: You need a staunch command of language and a natural grace with rational and creative discourse. A precision with words and an uncanny sense of good structure and narrative skills also helps. And because editors work with all sorts of people with different editorial goals in mind, you also need thick-skinned diplomatic skills— to tease out ideas and endure rounds of revisions. You're on your way to being a versatile editor when you can take apart a piece, then re-stitch it together again, and still convey the author’s original intentions. But I learned early on that creative and technical ability alone wasn’t enough to succeed. Freelancing is a business after all. First, spend the time mastering the basics of marketing, operations and service delivery, and productivity. Read the “Freelancing 101 – The Basics” and “9 Tips for New Freelancers”. Michelle Goodman's Anti 9-to-5 blog and her book My So-Called Freelance Life: How to Survive and Thrive as a Creative Professional for Hire were my companions when the idea of freelancing first jolted me out of my cubicle. Then, get your freelance editing business off the ground with these guidelines:Read More…
  • Business
    5 Ways to Strategically Price Your Freelance Rates5 ways strategically price your freelance rates
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    How you price your services makes a big difference in how your business is viewed by prospective clients. For freelancers, especially those just starting out, the tendency is to price work on the low end to generate client leads and interest. But what freelancers end up doing is attracting the cutthroat bargain hunters— not a sustainable client base to have in the long run. Setting your rates low is a signal that shows you are indiscriminate in how you value yourself and your business. Building your freelance brand starts with the price tag you put on your services. When you first begin working with clients, your rates send a message to prospective buyers: “This is what I’m worth.” If you price too low to undercut competition, you end up sending the message that you aren’t confident in your abilities, and that you’ll take any job at any price. Setting your rates low is a signal that shows you are indiscriminate in how you value yourself and your business. Freelancers are independent professionals, as deserving to be taken seriously as any agency or corporation you compete with—it’s about time you start bolstering your professional brand by internalizing the belief that you have something invaluable and unique to offer.Read More…